The Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity (ACCB) is located about an hours drive from Siem Reap town, right next to the Kbal Spean archaeological site.

If you are a lover of nature & wildlife then it’s well worth the journey to see and learn about the incredible work happening here. Mike & his team at the ACCB are fighting to save some of Cambodia’s most threatened species, including the counties national bird the Giant Ibis, the IUCN stated in 2018 that there are less than 200 mature individuals left in the population.

The ACCB is home to a range of different species, some of which cannot be released back into the wild as they have been kept in captivity as pets or have sustained injuries that would make them unlikely to survive in the wild. Most are residents as part of a conservation and breeding programme to help increase species populations which dwindle due to the wide spread destruction of habitats and illegal hunting. 

The ACCB is open from Monday to Saturday and runs guided tours at 9:00AM & 1:00PM, please DO NOT VISIT AT ANY OTHER TIME. The ACCB is a conservation centre foremost not a tourist attraction, visitors are not permitted entry unless it is during a scheduled tour time. If you would like a private tour which we highly recommend to learn the most you can about the centre & the issues faced by Cambodia’s wildlife, then contact the ACCB directly to organise this.

There is no set entrance fee for the ACCB they only ask for donations, we would politely suggest giving a minimum of $5 per person. Some tight backpackers may feel less is appropriate…..don’t be that person. The ACCB is supported by Cologne zoo in Germany but your donations are exceptionally welcomed & needed by the centre to help save as many species as possible.

When visiting the ACCB it’s the perfect opportunity to visit some of Angkors more remote temples & ruins. The entrance to Kbal Spean waterfall & it’s 1,000 lingas is located next to the ACCB, while the impressive Banteay Srei is an easy stop on the way to or from the centre.